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December 8, 2011

How do you move a barn?

By Mark Sessumes December 8, 2011

Furthermore, what does moving a barn (click link for video) have to do with Lean?

Moving the barn

Moving the barn

  • Moving the barn is like moving an organization.
  • There’s a BIG difference between the tools and the ability to develop the various working parts to be successful.
  • There were tools involved – saws, rulers, welding equipment, hammers.  But that’s not the key to success.
  • Many different roles with different responsibilities.
    • Someone in leadership had a vision and compelling need.  They had to know where they were and where they wanted to go.
    • Leadership recognized the value of ‘people power’ , not simply cutting edge technology.  No cranes or trucks involved but there was innovation (or at least ingenuity).
    • Leadership created a plan with many parts – preparation, communication, coordination, schedules, execution, etc.
      • Someone had to build the hand rails.
      • Someone had to recruit the people.
      • Given the caps, overalls, and cowboy hats, I bet there was barbeque involved.  Someone had to prepare it.
      • Someone had to announce instructions using the bullhorn.
      • Someone had to run the video camera.
    • There were measures.  Someone calculated the weight of the barn and the number of people to know each had to lift their 90lbs.  They knew how many feet to arrive at the destination.
    • The announcer was coordinating the actions of the group.  He was also giving them recognition and encouragement.
    • People had to show up and participate.

TMAC’s emphasis in Lean deployment is the ability to identify and prepare the different roles to fulfill their respective responsibilities to move the organization along the journey to achieve the vision.  Tools are integral to the journey but in themselves are insufficient.  Working in ‘the white space’ beyond the punctuated activities related to training, events, and projects requires that we develop each role to fulfill their responsibilities.

  • Top Leadership – focus, inspire, and engage the organization.  From strategy development/planning to management systems to measurements, recognition/rewards, communication, etc.
  • Value Stream Managers – transform the value stream.  Create and implement the VS management system (not just a map), and actively manage the transformation to the future state across multiple improvement activities.
  • Supervision – change behaviors.  Designing new methods and creating a sum of daily habits conforming to the new methods are two different things.  Supervision focus on changing behaviors including but not limited to safety, standardization, simplification, scientific method, social responsibility, and self-discipline.  There are multitudes of mechanisms to accomplish each.  What do you use?
  • Workforce – participate.  Either in structured projects or equally importantly, outside of formal projects/events.  Getting them to show up, mentally, physically.
  • Coaches – guide and mentor the other roles.  Are you prepared to guide top leadership?  Do you know what they should do?

What are you doing to work in the white space?

January 25, 2011

Toyota Kata = TWI?

By Pat Boutier January 25, 2011
Cover of Mike Rother's Book "Toyota Kata"

Cover of "Toyota Kata"

I’ve been reading Mike Rother’s latest book, Toyota Kata.  It looks like it actually is describing the TWI (Training Within Industry) Methodology to a “T” !

I haven’t noticed that he has mentioned TWI in his book (remember I haven’t read the book itself, yet).

Any thoughts and comparisons?

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